A Mention in The Rope Newsletter

About a year ago now, there was a little write-up done on me and my work in the english language newsletter of the Japanese model ship society, The Rope.

I posted this entry on my ship modeling blog site, but realized today that I hadn’t shared it on Wasenmodeler. Much of the reason for mentioning me in the newsletter is due to my fascination for traditionl Japanese watercraft, so I figured I really should be posting something about it here.

Ship Modeler

It’s nice when you don’t have to toot your own horn because somebody else does it for you. In the latest edition of The Rope News, which is the newsletter of the Japanese ship model society in Tokyo, my friend Norio Uriu, who is the Director of International Relations for the group, did a nice little write up on me and my work on Japanese traditional boats.

I was introduced to Norio-san through ship modeler Don Dressel of the Ship Modelers Association of Fullerton, California. Don and I both built models of Woody Joe’s Higaki Kaisen kit and we exchanged a few emails about building Woody Joe kits. I built some of the other Japanese traditional boat kits, and he built a Japanese pagoda and Woody Joe’s Egyptian Sun Ship kit.

Having Norio-san as a contact in Japan, we made arrangements to meet for dinner one evening in Tokyo…

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Japanese Boats Theme at the 2019 Wooden Boat Festival

I’ve stepped in it this time… Having agreed to participate in this year’s Wooden Boat Festival with a display of Japanese boat models, I just learned today that they are making this year’s theme “Japanese Boat Building”, specifically mentioning, among other things, Japanese Boat Models.

This morning, I received an email from Douglas Brooks, who encouraged me to participate. He sent me a link to the following blog post that was recently published by the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend, Washington.

Japanese Boat Building theme at 2019 Wooden Boat Festival

So, it looks like I’m in it as I’ll be the only builder of Japanese boat models there. I think I need to learn to be more confident about my knowledge of both the models and of Japanese boat building and to realize that I have a certain, if limited, expertise on the subject.

I’ll be bringing several of my models to the show, but will try to focus on my scratch projects. I do have my Hozugawabune, Bekabune, Kamakura period trade boat, and a mostly finished Kobaya. Also, I should have a completed Tenma-zukuri chabune and a miniature Hozugawa kudari bune, or river tour boat, that I recently started, but more on that later.

I’ll have a table set up for the models, but will also be demonstrating my Japanese boat building techniques at various times throughout the festival. That should give me two full months in which to refine my techniques!

Douglas is also trying to get me to sing a song at their boat launching ceremony that takes place on the last day of the event. I think he’s determined to make it happen. I also think I’m going to be urged to bring a shamisen too (3-stringed fretless lute played with a plectrum), and to play some music some time during the 3-day event, though I’m not really much of a soloist.

I would try to just stick to displaying my models, but he has gone out of his way to get me involved in the event and the event organizers have even arranged for a place for me to stay, so I think I’d better do what I can. And, who knows, maybe I’ll be “discovered” as a new Japanese music talent. Ω

Building a Tenma-Zukuri Chabune (伝間造茶船) – Part 2

In my last post, I discussed the building of a tenma-zukuri chabune from the Funakagami, and I stated that I was working on my model, but didn’t actually talk about building the model. The fact is that I wasn’t sure about what scale to build it at, given that a 1/10-scale model would end up being a little over two feet long, and I’m running low on space to display or store my models. So, I started a 1/20-scale model to see how I’d feel about the smaller scale.

I began by making a temporary internal frame. This would allow me to build the shiki, or bottom, and add the miyoshi, or stem, and the todate, or transom, at the proper angles. The same goes for the tana, or hull planks.

The longitudinal member of the framework is shaped directly from a copy of my plan drawing. The cross pieces are located at positions of the funabari, or beams, and are shaped according to my drawings.

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